R01

Characterization of combined skin wound dressings with respect to regenerative and toxic properties in vitro and ex vivo

Investigator

Name:Prof. Dr. Steffen Emmert
Affiliation:Clinic and Policlinic for Dermatology and Venereology, Rostock University Medical Centre
Email:steffen.emmert@med.uni-rostock.de

Project description

Wound dressings are supposed to support healing processes during tissue regeneration. However, biomaterials used in wound dressings may also have adverse effects on the regenerative healing processes. Against this background, the project will investigate the local cytocompatibility of metal-functionalized wound dressings. Therefore, innovative degradable electrospun nanofiber fleeces coated with silver or titanium dioxide, as well as commercially available wound dressings, will be tested for their cytotoxicity, DNA toxicity, and mutagenicity. Furthermore, a combination of selected novel and metal-functionalized wound dressings with cold atmospheric plasma will be assessed in vitro and ex vivo for their cytotoxic and regenerative properties. The results will be correlated with longitudinal omics data from the population-based epidemiological Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND).

Aims of the project

  1. To identify cytocompatible metal-functionalized nanofiber fleeces with optimized regenerative properties.
  2. To determine the effects of metal-functionalized nanofiber fleeces in combination with cold atmospheric plasma.
R02

Development and analysis of polymer matrices with specific biomaterial-cell interaction and delayed release of biologically active substances

Investigator

Name:Prof. Dr. Niels Grabow
Affiliation:Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Rostock University Medical Centre
Email:niels.grabow@uni-rostock.de

Project description

Biomaterials such as wound dressings are crucial for tissue regeneration as they provide structural support and antimicrobial benefits. However, their properties can also have a negative impact on regeneration. Research will focus on exploring combined biomaterials for improved tissue regeneration, with an emphasis on toxic properties and potential incompatibilities. For the analysis of cell-biomaterial interactions, polymer films and nanofibrous nonwovens will be produced and morphologically and physicochemically characterized. These materials are essential for in vitro and in vivo studies on tissue incompatibility and enable the delayed release of substances such as metal ions or particles from metal alloys. The use of compact and porous carrier structures that vary in terms of their specific surface-to-volume ratio enables the development of systems with different release kinetics. The kinetics of the delayed release will be compared between the produced release systems. Furthermore, as part of the study, fiber-based matrices with poly-p-dioxanone (PPDO) are produced in which silver and titanium dioxide particles are embedded. These biomaterials will be characterized and compared with regard to their function as wound dressings, including comparisons to antimicrobial dressings with nanosilver coatings.

Aims of the project

  1. To develop and optimize release systems for the controlled release of particles and metal ions. This includes the identification of suitable polymers. The work initially focuses on compact carriers, releasing embedded metal particles in a degradation-controlled manner of less than three to six months. The influences of thermodynamic and chemical properties on the intended release kinetics are studied in vitro.
  2. To produce porous fibrillar wound dressings by mimicking the requirements of the target tissue and creating layered structures in sandwich form via dual and coaxial electrospinning of two differently degradable polymers. The investigations include the selection of polymers, pore sizes, additives, and metal loading, as well as the interaction of nanofibers and their orientation with cellular systems.